• Publications of Anne Allison

      • Books

          • A. Allison.
          • (October, 2013).
          • Precarious Japan.
          • Duke University Press.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2010).
          • Kiku to Pokemon: Guro-barukasuru nihon no bunkaryouku.
          • Shinchousha.
          • (This is the Japanese translation of my book, Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination.)
          • A. Allison.
          • (1996).
          • Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Comics, and Censorship in Japan.
          • Westview (HarperCollins).
          • (Paperback edition, University of California Press, 2000.)
          • A. Allison.
          • (1994).
          • Nightwork: Sexuality, Pleasure, and Corporate Masculinity in a Tokyo Hostess Club.
          • University of Chicago Press.
          • [PDF]
      • Published Articles

          • A. Allison.
          • (2012).
          • "A Sociality Of, and Beyond, 'My-Home' in Post-Corporate Japan".
          • In Henrietta Moore and Nick Long (Eds.),
          • Sociality, New Directions
          • ,
          • New Directions
          • Cambridge University Press.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2012).
          • "A Sociality Of, and Beyond, 'My-Home' in Post-Corporate Japan".
          • Cambridge Anthropology
          • Nick Long and Henrietta Moore (Eds.),
          • ,
          • 30
          • (1)
          • .
          • A. Allison.
          • (2012).
          • Ordinary Refugees: Social Precarity and Soul in 21st Century Japan.
          • Anthropological Quarterly
          • ,
          • 85
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 345-370.
          • A. Allison.
          • (Summer, 2009).
          • Shakaisei no ima, kansei, kazoku, soshite nihon no kodomo ("Sociality Today: Sentiment, Family, and Japanese Youth").
          • In Todaishaken (Institute of Social Sciences, Tokyo University); Genda Yuji and Uno, Shigeki (Eds.),
          • Kobougaku 4: Kibou no hajimari: ryuudookasuru sekaide: The Social Sciences of Hope, Volume 4: The Beginning of Hope: In a World of Flux
          • ,
          • Social Sciences of Hope
          • ,
          • 4
          • ,
          • (pp. 129-149).
          • Tokyo Daigaku Shuppansha.
          • A. Allison.
          • (Summer, 2009).
          • Pocket Capitalism and Virtual Intimacy: Pokemon as Symptom of Postindustrial Youth Culture.
          • In Jennifer Cole and Deborah Durham (Eds.),
          • Figuring the Future: Youth and Globalization
          • School of American Research.
          • [PDF]
          • A. Allison.
          • (Spring, 2009).
          • The Cool Brand and Affective Activism of Japanese Youth.
          • Theory, Culture & Society
          • ,
          • 26
          • (3)
          • .
          • [PDF]
          • A. Allison.
          • (Spring, 2009).
          • The Attractions of the J-Wave for American Youth.
          • In Watanabe Yasushi and David McConnell (Eds.),
          • Soft Power Superpowers: Cultural and National Assets of Japan and the United States
          • M.E. Sharpe.
          • A. Allison.
          • (Winter, 2008).
          • La culture populaire japonaise et l'imaginaire global.
          • Critique Internationale
          • ,
          • 38
          • ,
          • 19-35.
          • A. Allison.
          • (Fall, 2006).
          • New-age Fetishes, Monsters, and Friends: Pokemon in the Age of Millennial Capitalism.
          • In Tomiko Yoda and Harry Harootunian (Eds.),
          • Japan after Japan
          • Duke University Press.
          • A. Allison.
          • (Fall, 2006).
          • The Japan Fad in Global Youth Culture and Millennial Capitalism.
          • Mechademia
          • Frenchy Lunning (Eds.),
          • ,
          • Emerging Worlds of Anime and Manga
          • ,
          • 1
          • (11-22)
          • University of Minnesota Press.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2004).
          • Cuteness as Japan's Millennial Product.
          • In Joseph Tobin (Eds.),
          • Pikachu's Global Adventure: The Rise and Fall of Pokemon
          • ,
          • (pp. 34-49).
          • Duke University Press.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2002).
          • Playing with Power: Morphing Toys and Transforming Heroes in Kids' Mass Culture.
          • In Jeannette Marie Mageo (Eds.),
          • Power and the Self
          • ,
          • (pp. 71-92).
          • Cambridge University.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2001).
          • Cyborg Violence: Bursting and Borders with Queer Machines.
          • Cultural Anthropology
          • ,
          • 16
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 237-265.
          • [web]
          • A. Allison.
          • (2001).
          • Memoirs of the Orient.
          • Journal of Japanese Studies
          • ,
          • 27
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 381-398.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2001).
          • Carne Furente: Bambole Guerriere Attraverso il Pacifico.
          • La Bambola e il Robottone
          • Alessandro Gomarasca (Eds.),
          • ,
          • Einaudi
          • ,
          • 145-178.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2001).
          • Ogetti e magia come valuta di scambio: Il Gioco Globale dei Pokemon.
          • La Bambola e il Robottone
          • Alessandro Gomarasca (Eds.),
          • ,
          • Einaudi
          • ,
          • 263-278.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2000).
          • A Challenge to Hollywood? Japanese Character Goods Hit the US.
          • Japanese Studies
          • ,
          • 20
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 67-88.
          • A. Allison.
          • (1999).
          • Sailor Moon: Japanese Superheroes for Global Girls.
          • Japan Pop!: Inside the World of Japanese Popular Culture
          • Timothy J. Craig (Eds.),
          • Sage Press.
      • Book Chapters

          • A. Allison.
          • (Summer, 2006).
          • Tamagotchi: The Prosthetics of Presence.
          • Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination
          • (pp. 163-191).
          • University of California Press.
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          Book abstract, Millennial Monsters Within the past decade, the currency of made-in-Japan cultural goods has skyrocketed in the global marketplace. From sushi and karoke to martial arts and techno-ware, the globalization of Japanese “cool” today is being led by youth products: video games, manga (comic books), anime (animation), and cute characters that have fostered kid crazes from Hong Kong to Canada. What precisely is it about the fantasies enjoined by these goods and about the conditions of life that inspired them (and the everyday lives of consumers who adopt them) that accounts for such global popularity are the issues taken up in Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination. Delimiting the scope to two places, Japan (as producer) and the United States (as a burgeoning market for Japanese youth goods today) where the author conducted ethnographic fieldwork, the book examines four waves of entertainment properties in terms of their crossover traffic from Japan to the US. These are Mighty Morphin Power Rangers (a live action television show featuring a team of high schoolers who morph into cyber-warriors), Sailor Moon (a comic and cartoon about female super-morphers), tamagotchi (an electronic toy that hatches virtual pets), and Pokémon (a media-mix of cartoon, Game Boy game, movies, comic books, trading cards, and tie-in merchandise driven by the pursuit to “get” endless pocket monsters). Arguing that part of the appeal of such dreamworlds is the polymorphous perversity with which they scramble identity and mix (up) character constitution (bodies with recombinant parts, cyber-powers, morphing capability), the author traces the postindustrial milieu from which such fantasies have arisen in postwar Japan and been popularly received in the United States. From Godzilla—a prehistoric lizard mutated by nuclear testing—to Pokémon—wild monsters that get “pocketed” by their owners—Japan has been a monster-producer, whose commercialized fantasy-fare has gone from cheesy to cool. Currently infusing national coffers with much needed capital, both real and symbolic, Japanese entertainment goods carry a global imagination that, decentered from Americanization, is imprinted—as this book argues—with the logic of millennial capitalism. One sentence book summary By examining the crossover traffic between Japan and the United States of four waves of youth goods, Millennial Monsters explores the global popularity of Japanese youth today, questioning the make-up of the fantasies and the capitalistic conditions of the play properties involved.

          Millennial Monsters came out in June and went into its second printing in December.

          • A. Allison.
          • (2000).
          • Japanese Mothers and Obentōs: The Lunch Box as Ideological State Apparatus.
          • Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Comics, and Censorship in Japan
          • (pp. 81-104).
          • Berkeley, CA:
          • University of California Press.
          • [PDF]
      • Book Reviews

          • A. Allison.
          • (Summer, 2005).
          • Review of Tsukiji: The Fish Market at the Center of the World by Theodore Bestor.
          • Monumenta Nipponica
          • ,
          • 60
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 288-290.
          • (Winter, 2000).
          • Review of Karaoke Around the World: Global Technology, Local Singing.
          • Journal of Japanese Studies
          • ,
          • Toru Mitsui and Shuhei Hosokawa (Eds.),
          • 26
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 169-173.
          • Arthur Golden.
          • (2000).
          • Memoirs of a Geisha.
          • Education About Asia
          • ,
          • 5
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 42-44.
          • Aviad Raz.
          • (Summer, 2000).
          • Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland.
          • Monumenta Nipponica
          • ,
          • 55
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 315-317.
      • Papers Accepted

          • A. Allison.
          • (July, 2013).
          • American Geishas and Oriental/ist Fantasies.
          • In Purnima Mankekar and Louisa Schein (Eds.),
          • Media, Transnationalism, and Asian Erotics
          • Duke University Press.
      • Preprints

          • A. Allison.
          • (2003).
          • Portable Monsters and Commodity Cuteness: Pokemon as Japan's New Global Power.
          • Journal of Postcolonial Studies
          • Anne Allison and Larry Grossberg (Eds.),
          • ,
          • 6
          • (3)
          • Routlege.
          • A. Allison.
          • (2003).
          • Introduction to Special Issue on Children and Globalization.
          • Journal of Postcolonial Studies
          • Anne Allison and Larry Grossberg (Eds.),
          • ,
          • 6
          • (3)
          • .
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