• Publications of J. Lorand Matory

      • Books

          • JL Matory.
          • (2014).
          • Stigma and Culture: Global Migrations and the Crisis of Identity in Black America.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The dialectical construction of "cultural" identities among Caribbean immigrants, African immigrants, Louisiana Creoles of color,Native Americans of African descent, Gullah-Geechees, and soi-disant "middle-class" African Americans in and around Howard University is a locus classicus for the hypothesis that stigma is a driving force behind ethnogenesis worldwide. As a world of the stigmatized and ambitious, the university is an important site of the articulation of "cultural" identities whereby discreditable populations endeavor to distinguish themselves from the main "constituent other"–in this case, ostensibly normative African Americans–in the social field that they share. I coin the term "ethnological Schadenfreude" to explain the a priori and logically concomitant representation of the constituent other as culturally inferior. Author's Comments:The book has been revised following anonymous review and is scheduled for publication in 2014.

          The book has been revised following anonymous review and is scheduled for publication in 2014.

          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2014).
          • Religión del Atlántico negro: Tradición, Transnacionalismo y Matriarcado en el Candomblé Brasileño.
          • Santiago de Cuba, Cuba:
          • Editorial Oriente/Casa del Caribe.
          Publication Description

          Spanish-language translation of Black Atlantic Religion. The classical African-inspired religions of the Americas result not from the inert "survival " of African identities and practices predating the slave trade but from a circum-Atlantic "dialogue" among Africans, African Americans, European colonialists, white creoles, and culturally hybrid black trans-Atlantic travelers, who selectively canonized and revised their African-inspired religions in reaction to the politics of multiple African colonies and American nation-states.

          This book was solicited for translation and presentation as the featured book of the "Festival del Caribe" in July 2014 or 2015, hosted by the Casa del Caribe in Santiago de Cuba.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2014).
          • Religión Afro-Atlántica: Tradición, Trasnacionalismo y Matriarcado en el Candomblé Brasileño.
          • Editorial Oriente/Casa del Caribe.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Spanish-language translation of Black Atlantic Religion. The classical African-inspired religions of the Americas result not from the inert "survival " of African identities and practices predating the slave trade but from a circum-Atlantic "dialogue" among Africans, African Americans, European colonialists, white creoles, and culturally hybrid black trans-Atlantic travelers, who selectively canonized and revised their African-inspired religions in reaction to the politics of multiple African colonies and American nation-states. Author's Comments: This book was solicited for translation and presentation as the featured book of the "Festival del Caribe" in July 2014 or 2015, hosted by the Casa del Caribe in Santiago de Cuba.

          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2012).
          • "Stigma and Culture: Global Migrations and the Crisis of Identity in Black America".
          • University of Chicago Press.
          Publication Description

          Culture and Stigma concerns personal experiences and the cultural self-fashioning of Louisiana Creoles of color, Indians of partly African ancestry, Gullah/Geechees, West Indians, and Africans at Howard University and in its alumni networks. The book explores the role of racism and other forms of stigma in the propagation of ethnic identities.

          I completed the manuscript in November.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2012).
          • The Homeward Ship: Analytic Tropes as Maps of and for African-Diaspora Cultural History".
          • University of Wisconsin Press.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2009).
          • Black Atlantic Religion: Tradition, Transnationalism, and Matriarchy in the Afro-Brazilian Candomble.
          • Princeton University Press.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Black Atlantic Religion illuminates the mutual transformation of African and African-American cultures, highlighting the example of the Afro-Brazilian Candomblé religion. This book contests both the recent conviction that transnationalism is new and the long-held supposition that African culture endures in the Americas only among the poorest and most isolated of black populations. In fact, African culture in the Americas has most flourished among the urban and the prosperous, who, through travel, commerce, and literacy, were well exposed to other cultures. Their embrace of African religion is less a "survival," or inert residue of the African past, than a strategic choice in their circum-Atlantic, multicultural world. With counterparts in Nigeria, the Benin Republic, Haiti, Cuba, Trinidad, and the United States, Candomblé is a religion of spirit possession, dance, healing, and blood sacrifice. Most surprising to those who imagine Candomblé and other such religions as the products of anonymous folk memory is the fact that some of this religion's towering leaders and priests have been either well-traveled writers or merchants, whose stake in African-inspired religion was as much commercial as spiritual. Morever, they influenced Africa as much as Brazil. Thus, for centuries, Candomblé and its counterparts have stood at the crux of enormous transnational forces. Vividly combining history and ethnography, Matory spotlights a so-called "folk" religion defined not by its closure or internal homogeneity but by the diversity of its connections to classes and places often far away. Black Atlantic Religion sets a new standard for the study of transnationalism in its subaltern and often ancient manifestations.

          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2005).
          • Black Atlantic Religion: Tradition, Transnationalism and Matriarchy in the Afro-Brazilian Candomble.
          • Princeton, NJ:
          • Princeton University Press.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Candomble and other African-inspired cultural phenomena are often thought to be the products of inert survival. Instead, they are often the products of strategic choice and invention amid ongoing communication by their practitioners with contemporaneous populations in Africa, and with merchants, writers, and politicians from other places and other classes. Throughout the century and a half of their active documentation, Candomble and similar African-diaspora practices demonstrate that transnationalism is not new.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2005).
          • Sex and the Empire That Is No More: Gender and the Politics of Metaphor in Oyo-Yoruba Religion.
          • second edition,
          • Berghahn Books.
          • (Edited and updated version of the original 1994 publication)
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The form and role of orisa-worship among the West Africa Yoruba has changed during the past two centuries in ways correlated with the changing overall political system. The relationships between men and women have provided two majors sorts of metaphor for the healthy and orderly relationship between gods and humans, rulers and subjects. The ritual metaphors invoked by priests and rulers have, in turn, transformed the quotidian relationships between men and women.

          • JL Matory.
          • (1986).
          • Vessels of Power: the Dialectical Symbolism of Power in Yoruba Religion and Polity - Part Two.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Part Two of Master's thesis in Anthropology at the University of Chicago, award the Roy D. Albert Prize for Excellence in the Study of Anthropology. Concerns the history of vessels and metaphors of containment and "mounting" in the delegation of sacred and political power in Yorubaland.

          • JL Matory.
          • (1986).
          • Vessels of Power: the Dialectical Symbolism of Power in Yoruba Religion and Polity - Part One.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Part One of Master's thesis in Anthropology at the University of Chicago, award the Roy D. Albert Prize for Excellence in the Study of Anthropology. Concerns the history of vessels and metaphors of containment and "mounting" in the delegation of sacred and political power in Yorubaland.

          • JL Matory.
          • (1982).
          • A Broken Calabash: Social Aspects of Worship among Brazilian and West African Yoruba--Part Two.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Part Two of A Senior honors thesis at Harvard College, awarded High Honors/Magna Cum Laude. A comparison of the social organization of orisha worship in Nigeria and Brazil.

          • JL Matory.
          • (1982).
          • A Broken Calabash: Social Aspects of Worship among Brazilian and West African Yoruba--Part One.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Part One of Senior honors thesis as Harvard College, awarded High Honors and Magna Cum Laude. A comparison of the social organization of orisha worship in Nigeria and Brazil.

      • Papers Published

          • JL Matory.
          • (2014).
          • From ‘Survival’ to ‘Dialogue’: Analytic Tropes in the Study of African-Diaspora Cultural History.
          • manual
          • I Kummels and C Rauhut and S Rinke and B Timm (Eds.),
          • Transatlantic Caribbean: Dialogues of People, Practices, Ideas
          • ,
          • 33-55.
          • Bielefeld, Germany:
          • Transcript Verlag.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          About the changing analytic metaphors and other tropes that have informed research on African-diaspora cultural history. Each one highlights and hides dimensions of cultural change in the diaspora.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2013).
          • One Duke professor’s Trayvon Martin moment.
          • News & Observer
          • .
          • [web]
      • Articles & Book Chapters

          • JL Matory.
          • (2016).
          • Watering the Flowers While Black.
          • News & Observer (Raleigh, NC)
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2015).
          • In-Depth Review--The Formation of Candomble: Vodun History and Ritual in Brazil, by Luis Nicolau Pares.
          • The Americas: A Quarterly Review of Latin American History
          • ,
          • 72
          • (04)
          • ,
          • 609-628.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Critical review of Pares's The Formation of Candomble. The ongoing interaction between African and African-diaspora populations explains much that is neglected in models of cultural "memory" and "forgetting."

          • JL Matory.
          • (June 3, 2015).
          • Hurt People Hurt People.
          • manual
          • Savage Minds: Notes and Queries in Anthropology.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Why I signed the petition for the American Anthropological Association to boycott Israeli academic institutions.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2015).
          • Stureplan People: Region, Race and Class in Today’s Sweden.
          • Transition
          • ,
          • 118
          • Indiana University Press.
          • [web]
          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2015).
          • Book Review of Witchcraft, Intimacy, and Trust: African in Comparison, written by Peter Geschiere.
          • ,
          • 44
          • (3-4)
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          Review of a book by eminent Africanist anthropologist Peter Geschiere

          • JL Matory.
          • (2015).
          • Stureplan People: Racial Fantasy and Human Reality in Today's Sweden.
          • Transition
          • ,
          • 118
          • (118)
          • ,
          • 47-60.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Immigrants and refugees, and especially those identified by their dark skin, are now the chief symbols of Swedes' disappointment with northern Europeans' gradual loss of economic security amid globalization. But the Stureplan people are a further hated anti-symbol of what is nostalgically regarded as an economically secure and egalitarian past, which, in fact, always included a great inequality of opportunity and esteem across the diverse white-skinned regions and ethnic groups of Sweden.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2014).
          • Affirmative Scapegoating.
          • The Harvard Crimson
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2013).
          • One Duke Professor's Trayvon Martin Moment.
          • The News and Observer (Raleigh, NC)
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (February, 2012).
          • He Fit the Description: Prejudice and Pain in Progressive Communities.
          • manual
          • A Smedley and JF Hutchinson (Eds.),
          • Racism in the Academy: The New Millenium
          • ,
          • 138-44.
          • American Anthropological Association.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (June 2, 2009).
          • What Harvard Has Taught Me.
          • Harvard Crimson
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2009).
          • The Many Who Dance in Me: Afro-Atlantic Ontology and the Problem with 'Transnationalism.
          • manual
          • TJ Csordas (Eds.),
          • Transnational Transcendence: Essays on Religion and Globalization
          • ,
          • 231-262.
          • University of California Press.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          This innovative collection examines the transnational movements, effects, and transformations of religion in the contemporary world, offering a fresh perspective on the interrelation between globalization and religion. Taken as a whole, Transnational Transcendence challenges some widely accepted ideas about this relationship, in particular, that international contemporary religious manifestations are secondary to the primary economic phenomenon of globalization.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2009).
          • Obituary: Elliot Percival Skinner (1924-2007).
          • AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGIST
          • ,
          • 111
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 127-130.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Obituary of the doyen of African-American anthropology, Franz Boas Professor Emeritus Elliot P. Skinner, of Columbia University.

          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2009).
          • "Letter to the Harvard Class of 1982." In Harvard and Radcliffe Class of 1982: 30th Anniversary Report (pp. 327-330). Cambridge, MA: Class Report Office.
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (Spring, 2009).
          • 'Favorite Professors' Open Letter to the Class of 2009.
          • Harvard Yearbook
          • E Liu (Eds.),
          • Harvard College Yearbook
          • ,
          • 2009
          • ,
          • 2009
          • ,
          • 53-53.
          • Cambridge, MA:
          • Harvard Yearbook Publications.
          Publication Description

          A reflection on the historic events of the past 22 years and of the past four years, appealing to the justice-minded activism of the graduating seniors. Also my farewell to Harvard.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2008).
          • The illusion of isolation: The Gullah/Geechees and the political economy of African culture in the Americas.
          • Comparative Studies in Society and History
          • ,
          • 50
          • (4)
          • ,
          • 949-980.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The Gullah/Geechee people are the locus classicus for the study of "African survivals" in North American culture. As such, they have been saddled with the duty to generate universal principles for the explanation of Africans' acculturation, adaptation, and cultural resistance in the Western hemisphere, and they provide the main North American test case for explanatory principles generated elsewhere in the Americas. Yet, the well-studied Gullah/Geechee case, like the Afro-Atlantic world generally, holds untapped lessons about the historical genesis of cultures and ethnic identities worldwide. Is isolation the normal precondition and conservator of cultural and ethnic distinctiveness? And do the enslaved and their descendants choose their ancestors' ways and identities mainly when and where isolation from the oppressor has made the oppressor's cultural alternatives unavailable? The existing literature on the Gullah/Geechee people of the southeastern U.S. coast and islands says "yes" to these questions, which also stand at the heart of both black Atlantic and global cultural history. © 2008 Society for the Comparative Study of Society and History.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2008).
          • Islands Are Not Isolated: Reconsidering the Roots of Gullah Distinctiveness.
          • manual
          • D Rosengarten and T Rosengarten and E Schildkrout and JA Carney (Eds.),
          • Grass roots: African origins of an American art
          • ,
          • 232-244.
          • Long Island City, NY:
          • University of Washington Press.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          In this investigation of America's most enduring African-inspired art form, the Lowcountry basket becomes a prism through which to explore 300 years of American and African history.

          • JL Matory.
          • (June 5, 2008).
          • What do Critics of Israel Have to Fear?.
          • manual
          • ,
          • 2008
          • (June 5)
          • The Harvard Crimson.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Documents multiple recent cases at Harvard University where critics of Israel were silenced in violation of principles that protect free speech on other topics.

          • JL Matory.
          • (February 5, 2008).
          • Obituary: David Maybury-Lewis: Anthropologist keen to protect the interests of the peoples of central Brazil.
          • manual
          • ,
          • 2008
          • (Feb 5)
          • The Guardian.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Leading structuralist and Harvard anthropologist David Maybury-Lewis not only studied but also set the standard for culturally informed service and assistance to the indigenous peoples of lowland South America.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2008).
          • Is There Gender in Yorùbá Culture?.
          • manual
          • JK Olupona and T Rey (Eds.),
          • Òrìşà devotion as world religion : the globalization of Yorùbá religious culture
          • ,
          • 513-558.
          • University of Wisconsin Press.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          As the twenty-first century begins, tens of millions of people participate in devotions to the spirits called Òrìsà. This book explores the emergence of Òrìsà devotion as a world religion, one of the most remarkable and compelling developments in the history of the human religious quest. Originating among the Yorùbá people of West Africa, the varied traditions that comprise Òrìsà devotion are today found in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Australia. The African spirit proved remarkably resilient in the face of the transatlantic slave trade, inspiring the perseverance of African religion wherever its adherents settled in the New World. Among the most significant manifestations of this spirit, Yorùbá religious culture persisted, adapted, and even flourished in the Americas, especially in Brazil and Cuba, where it thrives as Candomblé and Lukumi/Santería, respectively. After the end of slavery in the Americas, the free migrations of Latin American and African practitioners has further spread the religion to places like New York City and Miami. Thousands of African Americans have turned to the religion of their ancestors, as have many other spiritual seekers who are not themselves of African descent. Ifá divination in Nigeria, Candomblé funerary chants in Brazil, the role of music in Yorùbá revivalism in the United States, gender and representational authority in Yorùbá religious culture--these are among the many subjects discussed here by experts from around the world. Approaching Òrìsà devotion from diverse vantage points, their collective effort makes this one of the most authoritative texts on Yorùbá religion and a groundbreaking book that heralds this rich, complex, and variegated tradition as one of the world's great religions.

          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2008).
          • "Feminismo, nacionalismo, e a luta pelo significado do ade no Candomble.
          • Revista de Antropologia: Revista de Antropologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo
          • ,
          • 51
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 107-121.
          • [PDF]
          Publication Description

          US-based feminist anthropologist Ruth Landes introduced homophobic ideas into the Brazilian elite's understanding and treatment of male-loving priests of the Afro-Brazilian Candomble religion. This influence helps to explain the relatively recent numerical dominance of priestesses over priests in this religion.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2008).
          • Free to Be a Slave: Slavery as a Metaphor in the Afro-Atlantic Religions.
          • manual
          • S Palmie (Eds.),
          • Africas of the Americas: Beyond the Search for Origins in the Study of Afro-Atlantic Religions
          • .
          Publication Description

          Whereas most African Americans and most university scholars regard enslavement as a demeaning condition, many African or African-inspired religions represent slaves as powerful and social hierarchy as a normal condition of life. Indeed, Christianity and Islam valorize slavery and the slave is ways that we seldom highlight or recognize as shaping publicly accepted conduct even in recent times.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2008).
          • Feminismo, nacionalismo, e a luta pelo significado do adé no Candomblé: ou, como Edison Carneiro e Ruth landes inverteram o curso da historia.
          • Revista de Antropologia: Revista de Antropologia da Universidade de São Paulo
          • ,
          • 51
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 107-120.
          • Universidade de São Paulo.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          US-based feminist anthropologist Ruth Landes introduced homophobic ideas into the Brazilian elite's understanding and treatment of male-loving priests of the Afro-Brazilian Candomble religion. This influence helps to explain the relatively recent numerical dominance of priestesses over priests in this religion.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2008).
          • Obituary: David Maybury-Lewis: Anthropologist keen to protect the interests of the peoples of central Brazil.
          • The Guardian
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2008).
          • What Do Critics of Israel Have to Fear?.
          • The Harvard Crimson
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Documents multiple recent cases at Harvard University where critics of Israel were silenced in violation of principles that protect free speech on other topics.

          • JL Matory.
          • (September 14, 2007).
          • Israel and Censorship at Harvard.
          • manual
          • The Harvard Crimson.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers and his advocates create a self-fulfilling prophecy by declaring all critics of Israel anti-semites.

          • JL Matory.
          • (June 7, 2007).
          • The Progressives’ Prejudice.
          • manual
          • ,
          • 2007
          • (June 27 A29)
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Like other communities of progressive and highly educated people, Harvard is often in denial about the perseverance of racism. Precipitated by the famous "Quad Incident," in which a fellow student called to police on black students holding a field day on campus.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2007).
          • Free to Be a Slave: Slavery as Metaphor in the Afro-Atlantic Religions.
          • Journal of Religion in Africa
          • ,
          • 37
          • (3)
          • ,
          • 398-425.
          • BRILL.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Scholars tend to regard enslavement as a form of disability inflicted upon the enslaved. This paper confronts the irony that not all black Atlantic peoples and religions conceive of slavery as an equally deficient condition or as the opposite of freedom and other rights that are due to respected human beings. Indeed, the religions of enslaved Afro-Latin Americans and their descendants—including Brazilian Candomblé, Cuban and Cuban-diaspora Ocha (or Santería) and Haitian Vodou—are far more ambivalent about slavery than most scholars and most Black North Americans might expect. In these religions, the slave is often understood to be the most effective spiritual actor, either as the most empowering servant of the supplicant's goals or as the most effective model for supplicants' own action upon the world. These ironies are employed to illuminate the unofficial realities of both the Abrahamic faiths and the North American practices of 'freedom'.

          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2007).
          • Letter to the Harvard Class of 1982. In Harvard and Radcliffe Class of 1982: Twenty-fifth Anniversary Report (pp. 707-709). Cambridge,MA: Class Report Office..
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2007).
          • Letter to the Harvard Class of 1982.
          • In Harvard and Radcliffe Class of 1982: Twenty-fifth Anniversary Report
          • .
          • [web]
          • J Matory.
          • (30 November 2007).
          • Orwellian Uses of Free Speech.
          • manual
          • ,
          • 2007
          • (Nov 30)
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          In recent debates at Harvard University, the discourse of "free speech" has been used to silence civil debate about Israel and its policies.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2007).
          • The Progressives’ Prejudice'.
          • The Harvard Crimson
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Like other communities of progressive and highly educated people, Harvard is often in denial about the perseverance of racism. Precipitated by the famous "Quad Incident," in which a fellow student called to police on black students holding a field day on campus.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2007).
          • Israel and Censorship at Harvard.
          • The Harvard Crimson
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Harvard University President Lawrence H. Summers and his advocates create a self-fulfilling prophecy by declaring all critics of Israel anti-semites.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2007).
          • Orwellian Uses of ‘Free Speech'.
          • The Harvard Crimson
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          In recent debates at Harvard University, the discourse of "free speech" has been used to silence civil debate about Israel and its policies.

          • JL Matory.
          • (June 7, 2006).
          • Why I Stood Up: The Case Against Summers.
          • manual
          • ,
          • 2006
          • (June 7)
          • The Harvard Crimson.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          A detailed description of why the majority of the Harvard University faculty rejected the presidency of Lawrence H. Summers, after which he resigned.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2006).
          • The "New World" Surrounds an Ocean: Theorizing the Live Dialogue between African and African American Cultures.
          • manual
          • Yelvington, Kevin A. (Eds.),
          • Afro-Atlantic Dialogues: Anthropology in the Diaspora
          • ,
          • 501 pages.
          • School of American Research Press.
          • [web]
          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2006).
          • The New World Surrounds an Ocean: On the Live Dialogue between African and African American Cultures.
          • In Kevin Yelvington (Eds.),
          • Afro-Atlantic Dialogues
          • ,
          • (pp. 151-192).
          • Santa Fe, NM:
          • School of American Research.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2006).
          • Tradition, Transnationalism and Gender in the Afro-Brazilian Candomble.
          • manual
          • Sommer, Doris (Eds.),
          • Cultural Agency in the Americas
          • ,
          • 121-145.
          • Durham and London:
          • Duke University Press.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The transnational influence of US feminist anthropologist Ruth Landes and Brazilian nationalist pride fueled homophobia in the treatment of male Candomble priests by the Brazilian state and bourgeoisie. The "cult matriarchy" identified by Ruth Landes in the 1930s was less an observation than a self-fulfilling prophecy.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2006).
          • Why I Stood Up: the Case against Summers.
          • Harvard Crimson
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          A detailed description of why the majority of the Harvard University faculty rejected the presidency of Lawrence H. Summers, after which he resigned.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2004).
          • Gendered Agendas: the Secrets Scholars Keep about Yoruba-Atlantic Religion.
          • manual
          • S Gunning and TW Hunter and M Mitchell (Eds.),
          • Dialogues of Dispersal: Gender, Sexuality and African Diasporas
          • ,
          • A Gender and History special edition
          • ,
          • 13-43.
          • Malden, MA, and Oxford, UK:
          • Blackwell.
          • JL Matory.
          • (2004).
          • Sexual Secrets: Candomblé, Brazil, and the Multiple Intimacies of the African Diaspora.
          • manual
          • A Shryock (Eds.),
          • In Off Stage/On Display: Intimacy and Ethnography in the Age of Public Culture
          • ,
          • 157-190.
          • Palo Alto, CA:
          • Stanford University Press.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2003).
          • Gendered Agendas: The Secrets Scholars Keep about Yorùbá-Atlantic Religion.
          • Gender & History
          • ,
          • 15
          • (3)
          • ,
          • 409-439.
          • Blackwell Publishing.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Whereas scholars have often described the material interests served by any given social group's selective narration of history, this article catches scholars in the act of selectively narrating Yorùbá-Atlantic cultural history in the service of their own faraway activist projects. Anthropologist Ruth Landes' re-casting of the Afro-Brazilian Candomblá religion as an instance of primitive matriarchy not only encouraged feminists abroad but also led Brazilian nationalist power-brokers to marginalise the male, and often reputedly homosexual, priests who give the lie to Landes's interpretation. In the service of a longdistance Yorùbá nationalist agenda, sociologist Oyeronke Oyewumi has declared traditional Yorùbá society ‘genderless’, and found, among both North American feminist scholars and Yorùbá male scholars, allies in concealing the copious evidence of gender and gender inequality in Yorùbá cultural history. What these historical constructions lack in truth value they make up for in their power to mobilise new communities and alliances around the defence of a shared secret. The article addresses how politically tendentious scholarship on gender has inspired new social hierarchies and boundaries through the truths that some high-profile scholars have chosen to silence.

          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2002).
          • Contradiction and Forgetting among the Yewésseys.
          • Transforming Anthropology
          • ,
          • 10
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 2-12.
          • [PDF]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2001).
          • Contradiction and Forgetting in Yewéssey Culture.
          • Transforming Anthropology
          • ,
          • 10
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 2-12.
          • Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Anthropologists are now inescapably aware of conflict, contradiction, and negotiation in even the most seemingly "traditional" socio-cultural orders. The literature on "memory" is particularly rich in illustrations of how contradictory evocations of the past undergird conflicting performances and assertions of interest in the present. This study of the traditionally nomadic Yewéssey people documents a genre of performance seldom discussed in the anthropological literature—the ritual performance of forgetting as a means of resolving intractable conflicts and cultural contradictions. This essay is written with an undergraduate or lay audience in mind and is intended to introduce anthropological comparative method, and some of its most important vocabulary, in accessible language. Questions for classroom discussion are provided at the end.

          • JL Matory.
          • (2001).
          • Africans in the United States.
          • Footsteps: African American History and Heritage Magazine
          • ,
          • 3
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 6-9.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2001).
          • The Gullah and the Black Atlantic.
          • Footsteps: African American History and Heritage Magazine
          • ,
          • 3
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 10-11.
          • [web]
          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (2001).
          • Africans in the United States.
          • Footsteps: African American History and Heritage Magazine
          • ,
          • 6-9.
          • [PDF]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2001).
          • The Other African Americans.
          • Footsteps: African American History and Heritage Magazine
          • ,
          • 24-25.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2001).
          • El nuevo imperio Yoruba: Textos, migración y el auge transatlántico de la nación lucumí.
          • manual
          • R Hernández and J Coatsworth (Eds.),
          • Culturas encontradas: Cuba y los Estados Unidos
          • ,
          • 167-188.
          • Havana and Cambridge, MA:
          • Centro de Investigación y Desarrollo de la Cultura Juan Marinello and David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, Harvard University.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2001).
          • The cult of nations' and the ritualization of their purity.
          • SOUTH ATLANTIC QUARTERLY
          • ,
          • special issue on “Atlantic Genealogies”
          • ,
          • 100
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 171-214.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2000).
          • Cuba and African Diaspora Religion.
          • ReVista: Harvard Review of Latin America
          • .
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (2001).
          • Surpassing "survival": On the urbanity of "traditional religion" in the Afro-Atlantic world.
          • BLACK SCHOLAR
          • ,
          • 30
          • (3-4)
          • ,
          • 36-43.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1999).
          • Jeje: repensando nações e transnacionalismo.
          • Mana: estudos de antropologia social
          • ,
          • Rio de Janeiro
          • ,
          • 5
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 57-80.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1999).
          • The English professors of Brazil: On the diasporic roots of the Yoruba nation.
          • COMPARATIVE STUDIES IN SOCIETY AND HISTORY
          • ,
          • 41
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 72-103.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1999).
          • Afro-Atlantic Culture: On the Live Dialogue between Africa and the Americas.
          • manual
          • HL Gates and KA Appiah (Eds.),
          • Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience
          • ,
          • 36-44.
          • New York:
          • Basic Civitas Books.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1999).
          • Afro-Atlantic Culture: On the Live Dialogue between Africa and the Americas, first edition.
          • manual
          • KA Appiah (Eds.),
          • Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience, first edition
          • ,
          • 36-44.
          • Basic Civitas Books.
          Publication Description

          Africa is not to the black Americas as the past is to the present. Ongoing historical developments in Africa have continually influenced American cultural history, and, more surprisingly, ongoing historical developments in the Americas have continually influenced African history.

          • JL Matory.
          • (1999).
          • Afro-Atlantic Culture: On the Live Dialogue between Africa and the Americas.
          • manual
          • Gates, Henry Louis and Appiah, K. Anthony (Eds.),
          • Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience
          • ,
          • 1
          • ,
          • 36-44.
          • Basic Civitas Books.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1998).
          • Yorubá: As Rotas e as Raízes da Nação Transatlântica, 1830-1950.
          • Horizontes Antropológicos
          • ,
          • Porto Alegre, Brazil
          • ,
          • 4
          • (9)
          • ,
          • 263-292.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1998).
          • Yoruba: A World Civilization.
          • Calliope: World History for Young People
          • ,
          • February
          • ,
          • 4-6.
          • [web]
          • J. Lorand Matory.
          • (1997).
          • The King's Male-Order Bride: the Making of a Yoruba Priest in a Post-Modern Age.
          • In Flora Kaplan (Eds.),
          • Queens, Queen Mothers, Priestesses, and Power: Case Studies in African Gender
          • ,
          • 810 of the Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
          • ,
          • (pp. 381-400).
          • New York:
          • New York Academy of Arts and Sciences..
          • [PDF]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1997).
          • African and Afro-Caribbean Religions in the United States.
          • manual
          • D Eck (Eds.),
          • On Common Ground: World Religions in America
          • Columbia University Press.
          • JL Matory.
          • (1997).
          • The king's male-order bride - The modern making of a Yoruba Priest.
          • QUEENS, QUEEN MOTHERS, PRIESTESSES, AND POWER
          • ,
          • 810
          • ,
          • 381-400.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1997).
          • Religions, African, in the Americas.
          • manual
          • Middleton, John (Eds.),
          • The Encyclopedia of Sub-Saharan Africa
          • ,
          • 457-460.
          • New York:
          • Simon and Schuster.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1994).
          • Rival empires: Islam and the religions of spirit possession among the Òyóo-Yorùbá.
          • American Ethnologist
          • ,
          • 21
          • (3)
          • ,
          • 495-515.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1993).
          • Government by Seduction: History and the Tropes of 'Mounting' in Ọyọ-Yoruba Religion.
          • manual
          • Comaroff, Jean and Comaroff, John (Eds.),
          • Modernity and Its Malcontents: Ritual and Power in Africa
          • ,
          • 58-84.
          • Chicago:
          • University of Chicago Press.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1988).
          • Homens Montados: homossexualidade e simbolismo da possessão nas religiões afro-brasileiras (Mounted Men: homosexuality and the symbolism of possession in the Afro-Brazilian religions).
          • manual
          • Escravidão e Invenção da Liberdade
          • ,
          • 215-231.
          • São Paulo:
          • Editora Brasiliense.
          • [web]
      • Mass Media

          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2015).
          • Vodou and Other African Religions.
          • .
          • [web]
          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2015).
          • Vodou and Other African-Inspired Religions.
          • .
          • [web]
          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2015).
          • Vodou and Other African-Inspired Religions.
          • .
          • [web]
          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2014).
          • Lucumi Music: Singing, Dancing and Drumming Black Divnity.
          • .
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          The orichas and the foddunes of Cuba and its diaspora come alive through music and dance. This film documents a 2014 conference of the Center for African and African American Research at Duke University about the diverse genres of Afro-Cuban sacred drumming that turn human beings into gods. The cutting-edge ideas that emerged at the conference are illustrated in performance footage. “Lucumí Music” both illuminates and instantiates the century-old encounter among priests, dancers, drummers, researchers, state officials, and tourists has shaped the practice of Afro-Cuban religion today.

          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2012).
          • “Can We Talk?: Bridges between the Humanities and the Social Sciences” (2012)..
          • .
          • [web]
          • J.L. Matory.
          • (2012).
          • “Human Traffic: Past and Present”.
          • .
          • [web]
      • Book Reviews

          • JL Matory.
          • (2014).
          • Witchcraft Intimacy & Trust: Africa in Comparison.
          • JOURNAL OF RELIGION IN AFRICA
          • ,
          • 44
          • (3-4)
          • ,
          • 423-427.
          • [web]
          Publication Description

          Review of a book by eminent Africanist anthropologist Peter Geschiere

          • JL Matory.
          • (1998).
          • Book review of "Yoruba sacred kingship: 'A power like that of the gods.'".
          • Anthropological Quarterly
          • ,
          • 71
          • (3)
          • ,
          • 155-156.
          • George Washington University, Institute for Ethnographic Research.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1996).
          • Revisiting the African Diaspora –book review essay concerning Joseph M. Murphy’s Working the Spirit (1994), George Brandon’s Santeria from Africa to the New World (1993), and Ysamur Flores-Peña and Roberta J. Evanchuk’s Santería Garments and Altars (1994).
          • American Anthropologist
          • ,
          • 88
          • (1)
          • ,
          • 167-70..
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1993).
          • Review article on Creativity of Power: Essays on Cosmology and Action in African Societies (1989), eds. Ivan Karp and William Arens.
          • Journal of Religion in Africa
          • ,
          • Ivan Karp and William Arens (Eds.),
          • 23
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 175-180.
          • BRILL.
          • [web]
          • JL Matory.
          • (1991).
          • Book review of Africanisms in American Culture by JE Holloway.
          • American Anthropologist
          • ,
          • Joseph E. Holloway (Eds.),
          • 93
          • (2)
          • ,
          • 489-490.
          • American Anthropological Association.
          • [web]
      • Other

          • JL Matory.
          • (2007).
          • On Rings amid Somersaults There: Poetry, Parody, Parenting.
          • manual
          • Cambridge:
          • Two Birches Press.
          • [web]
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