The is a representative list of courses offered by the department and should not be used for schedule planning. For accurate and up-to-date course listings and information, Duke students should log into ACES.

Fall 2016

Course Title Instructor Section Time Room
CULANTH 80S
Studies-special Topics Galbraith, Patrick 02 MW 06:15 PM-07:30 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Opportunities for first-year students to engage with a specific issue in cultural anthropology, with emphasis on student writing. Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 101
Intro To Cultural Anthro Folch, Christine 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM White 107

Course Description

Theoretical approaches to analyzing cultural beliefs and practices cross-culturally; application of specific approaches to case material from present and/or past cultures. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 105
Intro To African Studies Smith, Stephen 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Gray 228

Course Description

A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in contemporary African Studies: nationalism and pan-Africanism, imperialism and colonialism, genocide and famine, development and democratization, art and music, age and gender. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 106S
Doc Exper: A Video Appr Hawkins, Gary 01 W 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Bridges 104

Course Description

A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. Working closely with these groups, students explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Students complete an edited video as their final project. Not open to students who have taken this course as Film/Video/Digital 105S. Instructor: Hawkins
CULANTH 113FS
Enterprising Civic Engagement Bergene, Lisa 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM West Duke 212

Course Description

An exploration of ways that students can exercise enterprising leadership to develop innovative, resourceful solutions to important civic issues within and external to Duke University. Course includes four primary focuses: understanding models of change, exploring and practicing enterprising leadership behaviors, reflecting upon ethical values, and designing and implementing a civic engagement project on campus. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Bergene
CULANTH 131
World Music Meintjes, Louise 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Biddle 102

Course Description

Study of musical styles and practices in relation to issues of creativity, forms of power, and cultural survival; focus on the music and experiences of indigenous peoples, refugees, migrants, and immigrants. Instructor: Meintjes or staff
CULANTH 170
Advertising/society: Global O'Barr, William 01 Tu 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

History and development of commercial advertising; advertising as a reflector and/or creator of social and cultural values; advertisements as cultural myths; effects on children, women, and ethnic minorities; advertising and language; relation to political and economic structure; and advertising and world culture. Emphasis on American society complemented by case studies of advertising in Canada, Japan, Mexico, Russia, Western Europe, and selected other countries. Instructor: O'Barr
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Byerly, Ingrid 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Collier, Richard 02 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Wagner, Laura 03 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Crowell 107

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190S
Topics In Cul. Anthropology (Staff) 01 - TBA

Course Description

Topics vary each semester. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 195
Comp Appr Global Issues Mathers, Catherine 01 MWF 03:20 PM-04:20 PM East Duke 204B

Course Description

Introduction to critical transnational studies through several disciplinary approaches. Examines capitalism and neo-liberal globalization and their relationships to culture, politics, economics, and other social forms and outcomes; considers transnationalism "from below"; addresses linear and Western-centric thinking about progress and modernity; focuses a historical lens on political discourses, institutions, and projects to understand them contextually; demonstrates how cultures and identities are dynamically constituted in interaction with historical, material, political, and situational factors; considers how different inequalities and contestations inflect most social formations. Instructor: Namakkal or Mathers
CULANTH 201
Intro To Linguistics Price, Gareth 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Languages 211

Course Description

Introduction to the scientific study of linguistics and languages. Topics include the origin and nature of language, methods of historical and comparative linguistics, theories and schools of linguistics, empirical and descriptive approaches to the study of language, including phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Instructor: Butters or Tetel
CULANTH 210
Global Culture Wesolowski, Katya 01 MW 08:30 AM-09:45 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Globalization examined through some of its dominant cultural forms the marketing of pop music, the globalization of TV culture, the spread of markets and commodities, the export of political ideologies. Special focus given to the way in which these forms both affect and are transformed by local cultures in Africa, South Asia, East Asia, and Latin America. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 211FS
Geopolitics And Culture Göknar, Erdag 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Social Sciences 107

Course Description

Study of countries on the geographical periphery of the commonly defined Middle East: Bosnia, Turkey, Armenia, Chechnya, Iran, and Afghanistan. All of these countries have deep Middle Eastern ties and traditions, sizeable communities with Middle Eastern origins and connections, and recent histories of cultural and ethnic conflict and violence. Exploration of how the Middle Eastern components and histories in these conflicts have been distorted and obscured as the conflicts have been depicted through the lenses of U.S. or Soviet/Russian geopolitical interests. Instructor: Goknar
CULANTH 212
Language And Society Baran, Dominika 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Allen 326

Course Description

Course examines language as a social practice, focusing on different aspects of its role in social life. Topics addressed include: language and social identity, such as ethnicity, social class, age, and gender; variation in language, including dialects, accents, and registers; multilingualism and language contact; new languages such as pidgins and creoles; language, culture, and intercultural communication; language and ideology; language in education and in the media. Through the discussion of these topics and homework including reading and small research projects, students are introduced to key concepts, theories, and methods in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Instructor: staff
CULANTH 215S
Indian Civilization Freeman, John 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM White 106

Course Description

Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of pre-modern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials. Instructor: Freeman
CULANTH 219S
Intro To Performance Studies Rogers, Bradley 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Page 106

Course Description

Introduction to field of performance studies, with examples drawn from music, dance, theatre, performance art, protests, rituals, and everyday life. Through comparative study of global performance, we explore the usefulness of concepts of ritual, play, and performativity as they relate to performance and technology; intercultural performance and implications and ethics of appropriation and borrowing; originality and imitation; archive and repertoire; performative writing; and the performative dimensions of gender, race, and sexuality. Instructor: Rogers
CULANTH 238S
Politics Of Food Thompson, Charles 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Bridges 113

Course Description

Explores the food system through fieldwork, study, and guest lectures that include farmers, nutritionists, sustainable agriculture advocates, rural organizers, and farmworker activists. Examines how food is produced, seeks to identify and understand its workers and working conditions in fields and factories, and, using documentary research conducted in the field and other means, unpacks the major current issues in the food justice arena globally and locally. Fieldwork required, but no advanced technological experience necessary. At least one group field trip, perhaps to a local farm or farmers market, required. Instructor: Thompson
CULANTH 241
Migrant China Litzinger, Ralph 01 Th 01:25 PM-03:55 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Introduction to the study of contemporary China, including Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora. Key themes include family and kinship, sex and gender, regional diversity, ethnic minority relations, the politics of modernity, revolution, and reform, and the representation of Chinese identity through popular media, film, and travel. Instructor: Litzinger
CULANTH 255
World Of Korean Cinema Kwon, Nayoung 01 W 04:55 PM-07:25 PM Allen 103

Course Description

The world of Korean cinema, broadly defined in terms of national, generic, theoretical boundaries, beyond conventional auteur, genre, one-way influence, and national cinema theories. Cinematic texts examined in local, regional, and global contexts and intersections, in conversation with global theories and histories of cinema, visual cultures, and other representational forms. Variable topics informed theoretically and politically by discourses on gender/sexuality, race/ethnicity, global flows of people and cultures, popular and "high" culture crossovers, transnational co-productions, remakes, translations and retellings. No knowledge of Korean language/ culture presumed. Instructor: Kwon
CULANTH 258S
Our Culinary Cultures Alexander, Kelly 01 F 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Bridges 113

Course Description

Documentary approach to the world of food using fieldwork research. Topics of food and its preparation examined through deep stories of how food is raised, prepared, and presented in order to explore how the myriad ways in which what we eat reveal key biographical, economic, religious, and other truths about our cultures. Introduces students to the history of food writing and the concept of food in general as a nonverbal tool of communication. Photography, audio, and documentary writing employed. Instructor: Alexander
CULANTH 261D
Race, Genomics, And Society Royal, Charmaine 001 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM East Duke 209

Course Description

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal
CULANTH 261D
Race, Genomics, And Society Royal, Charmaine 01D W 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Gross Hall 104

Course Description

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal
CULANTH 261D
Race, Genomics, And Society Royal, Charmaine 02D Th 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Biddle 102

Course Description

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal
CULANTH 261D
Race, Genomics, And Society Royal, Charmaine 03D Th 03:05 PM-04:20 PM West Duke 08A

Course Description

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal
CULANTH 261D
Race, Genomics, And Society Royal, Charmaine 04D F 10:05 AM-11:20 AM East Duke 209

Course Description

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal
CULANTH 262S
Documenting Black Experiences Tyson, Timothy 01 W 11:45 AM-02:15 PM Bridges 001

Course Description

Interpretations of the black diaspora in documentary film from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary study of black religions, cultures, histories, aesthetics, politics, and their representations, both globally and in the U.S. Students will view and study a variety of films and approaches to film and study film's evolution through numerous lenses from early ethnographic film to recent works by indigenous filmmakers, and understand the politics of representation, from D.W. Griffith to Spike Lee; read relevant works in the genres represented; and hear from guest critics, scholars of African and African American history and culture, and filmmakers. Instructor: Tyson
CULANTH 269
Black Gods And Kings Matory, J. 01 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

Surveys the spiritual, political and economic experience of those who worship African gods West and Central Africans, Cubans, Brazilians, Haitians, and North Americans. The gods as sources of power, organization and healing amid local political dominance of Muslims and Christians and seismic expansion of international capitalism. West African Yoruba religion, West-Central African Kongo religion, Brazilian Candomblé and Umbanda, Cuban Santería and Palo Mayombe, Haitian Vodou, and African American Pentecostalism are examined as belief systems, and contextualized to the trans-Atlantic slave trade, long-distance commerce and pilgrimage by free people
CULANTH 278
Sex/gender - Nature/nurture Williams, Christina 05 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Perkins 071

Course Description

Debates about sexuality, sex, and gender hinge on radically different ideas about relative effects of biological forces vs. social forces, or nature vs. nurture. Course changes terms of arguments about sexuality and gender and nature/nurture. Explores how nature/nurture emerged as scientific and popular debate. Evaluates new developments in science and cultural fields that are now reconsidering how biology and environments interact. Showcases debates about how sex and sexuality are formed through interplay of genetic information, hormones, material bodies, and social environments. Instructor: Wilson, Williams
CULANTH 290
Current Issues (topics) Parish, Erin 02 MW 06:15 PM-07:30 PM Smith Wrhs C104

Course Description

Selected topics in methodology, theory, or area. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Soule, Jacob 01 MF 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Friedl Bdg 118

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Hansen, Mark 02 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM White 106

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Dahiya, Annu 03 WF 01:25 PM-02:40 PM White 106

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 295S
Anthropology Of Childhood Wesolowski, Katya 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 106

Course Description

What does it mean to be and to raise a child? This course begins with the premise that childhood has existed, and continues to exist, in myriad forms. Using the tools of anthropology we will ask a series of questions: how do definitions of childhood and childrearing vary across history and culture? How do children s daily lives differ from place to place and how are race, class and gender linked to discourses and experiences of childhood and childrearing? What role does education formal and informal play in shaping childhood? Furthermore, how do children stand in as symbols of broader political and cultural concerns? Instructor: Wesolowski
CULANTH 301
Theoretical Foundations Nelson, Diane 01 WF 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Major schools and theories of cultural anthropology. Open to seniors and juniors. Sophomores by permission only. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 302
Fieldwork Methods Litzinger, Ralph 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice, including participation, observation, and interviews. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography. This requirement may also be satisfied by taking Cultural Anthropology 290A Duke in Ghana Anthropological Field Research. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 305S
White Supremacy Matory, J. 01 Th 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Carr 242

Course Description

Against the cross-cultural backdrop of other systems of hereditary privilege and of the political and economic changes that threaten them, we will examine the history, the ideologies, and the psychology of white supremacy in the United States. It will be our task to understand both the insiders' point of view and its social context, which includes the mid-20th-century civil rights reforms, affirmative action, neoliberalism, and the progressive erosion of white monopolies on honor, voting rights, due process, a living wage, and upward mobility in US society. Instructor: Matory
CULANTH 310S
Conflict Analysis In Africa Smith, Stephen 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Social Sciences 124

Course Description

Utilizes four case studies to outline components of conflict analysis in Africa. Examines regional crisis nexus between Darfur, Chad and Central African Republic. Looks at issues of post-coloniality, autochthony, migration, citizenship, land tenure, and inequality. On a theoretical level, identifies potentially cross-cutting, deeper layers of contemporary crises in Africa with the objective of establishing a series of templates, a 'protocol', for comparative conflict analysis and conflict management in Africa. Instructor: Smith
CULANTH 323
Fund. Of Global Mental Health Puffer, Eve 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Gray 220

Course Description

Examines global mental health from perspectives of culture, public health, epidemiology, human rights, policy, and intervention. Readings focus on peer-reviewed research literature highlighting topics such as the prevalence of mental health disorders worldwide, the role of culture in mental health, and the interventions backed by strong evidence for prevention and treatment. Students will discuss and critique study methodologies and explore the needs for future research in this emerging field. Designed for students with prior research methods and psychology coursework. Instructor: Puffer
CULANTH 327S
Pilgrimage Thompson, Charles 01 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Bridges 201

Course Description

Documentary and anthropological approaches to understanding . Different cultures, religions, histories, and levels of privilege make their way somewhere to pay tribute, give offerings, encircle a site, crawl on their knees, kiss a wall, touch a statue, or simply raise their hands in acknowledgement of finishing a goal, be it a walk on a trail or a prayerful walk to a religious icon; be it to commemorate, celebrate, mark a rite of passage, or to do penance. Explores how people make meaning and give their lives significance through pilgrimage. Students document a pilgrimage of their own, prepare for an upcoming pilgrimage, or interview those who have gone on pilgrimages. Instructor: Thompson
CULANTH 332S
Race In Durham Lau, Barbara A 01 M 06:30 PM-09:00 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

Individual student research, archival and interview-based, on the history and current status of ideas about race, racial discrimination, and race relations in the city of Durham, as a window into one regional and local pattern that illuminates larger patterns of race in the U.S. Open to undergraduates at both NCCU and Duke. Instructor: Hall
CULANTH 336
Hollywood And Africa Smith, Stephen 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Allen 103

Course Description

This course on Hollywood films about Africa from classics such as "African Queen" (East Africa), "Tarzan" (Equatorial Africa) and "Out of Africa" (Kenya) to recent productions such as "Blood Diamond" (Sierra Leone), "The Last King of Scotland" (Uganda), "Lord of War" (arms trade), "The Constant Gardner" (Kenya) and "Black Hawk Down" (Somalia) will tack back and forth between filmic representation and case study, using the latter to critique the former. As contrastive material, the class will also draw on non-Hollywood films about Africa, for example "Hotel Rwanda" (Rwanda) or "Lumumba" (DRC). Instructor: Smith
CULANTH 346S
Memory Bandits Kirk, Robin 01 TuTh 08:30 AM-09:45 AM Smith Wrhs C106

Course Description

This seminar introduces students to multiple approaches to how to create memory, with a focus on building a proposal for Duke to expand the sites where stories are told. We are particularly interested in how to tell difficult stories of slavery, segregation and inequality through new sites and interpretive plans. Students will create a Duke memory map and develop a Story Bank. The class is in part funded by Bass Connections and is affiliated with the Story Lab. Instructor: Kirk
CULANTH 397S
Language In Immigrant America Baran, Dominika 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Allen 306

Course Description

Discussion of issues of language in the context of immigration in the United States, from the turn of the 20th century until the present, combining approaches from literature, memoirs, language policy, media studies, and linguistic anthropology. Some fieldwork in an immigrant community. Topics include: identity, assimilation, race, bilingual communities, bilingual education, foreign accents, language contact. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 403S
Politics Of Memory Silverblatt, Irene 01 M 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Friedl Bdg 118

Course Description

Explores political contexts, and often competing visions, surrounding construction and reproduction of public memory. Asks how sites of memory, presenting an image of the past, express understandings, desires, and conflicts of the present. Particular focus on how times of crisis and trauma are commemorated, challenged, or hidden. Open only to juniors and seniors. Instructor: Silverblatt
CULANTH 415S
Interethnic Intimacies Kwon, Nayoung 01 M 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Perkins 070

Course Description

Critical examination of cultural dynamics, political economies, and ethical implications of interethnic intimacies or "intercourse" as represented from and about Asia. Examines shifts within and beyond "Asia," asking why cultural representations matter in ways societies construct, produce, and consume objects of desire and repulsion. Texts from literature and visual culture read along with theories of critical race studies, gender and sexuality, postcolonialism, globalization, visual culture, and other representative technologies of the Self/Other. Not open to students who have taken the freshman seminar. Instructor: Kwon
CULANTH 422
Myth, Ritual, Symbol Nelson, Diane 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Cross cultural examination of roles of myths, rituals, and symbols in meaning-making, creation of identity, reproduction of cultural forms and challenges to the construction of "normal." Draws on ethnography, classical anthropological theory, film and participant-observation. Explores functionalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, and feminist modes of analysis. Culture areas include Ndembu of Zambia, Maya of Guatemala, Turkish village life, Nazi Germany, and present-day United States. Instructor: Nelson
CULANTH 424-1
Medical Anthropology Solomon, Harris 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Cross-cultural study of health and illness. Instructor: Solomon
CULANTH 424K
Medical Anthropology Burns, Allan 01 MTuW 01:30 PM-03:10 PM DKUA 3109

Course Description

Cross cultural experiences and understanding of health and illness, the body and non-biological aspects of medicine. Culture-specific sickness (like envidia, running amok, attention deficit disorder). Class, race, and gender inflected experiences of health. Various societies' organization of health care specialists, including biomedical doctors, voudon priestesses, and shamans. Taught at Duke Kunshan University. Instructor: Burns
CULANTH 439
Queer China Rojas, Carlos 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Smith Wrhs C106

Course Description

Examines queer discourses, cultures, and social formations in China, Greater China, and the global Chinese diaspora from the late imperial period to the present. Course will focus on cultural representations, particularly literary and cinematic, but will also consider a wide array of historical, anthropological, sociological, and theoretical materials. Instructor: Rojas
CULANTH 440S
Games And Culture Ginsburg, Shai 01 Th 01:25 PM-03:55 PM Franklin Center 230

Course Description

Examines analog and computer games from a cultural perspective. Explores how prevailing culture and values affect game design, popularity, and experience. how games affect those areas of culture, such as imagining disaster, utopia and dystopia. Explores role-playing and identity, ethics, group behavior, competition, politics, gender, race, and aesthetics. Instructor: Ching, Ginsburg
CULANTH 481
Living/dying/healing In Russia Gheith, Jehanne 01 Tu 06:30 PM-09:00 PM Allen 103

Course Description

Explores ways historical, cultural, political forces shape major moments of the life course and the stories told to make sense of them. Team taught by a professor of literature and a professor of anthropology, focus is on family life, sexuality, childbearing and its prevention; biomedical health care and alternative healing; survival in gulag (concentration camp) conditions; care for the dead and dying and their families. By examining compelling works from a range of genres short story, ethnographic case study, memoir, and novel students will learn analytical techniques from both fields, and hone interpretive and writing skills. Knowledge of Russian is not required. Instructor: Gheith
CULANTH 498S
Senior Distinction Seminar Smithson, Brian 01 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 118

Course Description

No credit for Cultural Anthropology 498S without satisfactory completion of Cultural Anthropology 499S. Consent of director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 539S
Queer China Rojas, Carlos 01 M 03:05 PM-05:35 PM West Duke 202

Course Description

Examines queer discourses, cultures, and social formations in China, Greater China, and the global Chinese diaspora from the late imperial period to the present. Course will focus on cultural representations, particularly literary and cinematic, but will also consider a wide array of historical, anthropological, sociological, and theoretical materials. Not open to students who have taken Asian and Middle Eastern Studies 439. Instructor: Rojas
CULANTH 562S
African Cities Makhulu, Anne-Maria 01 Th 04:40 PM-07:10 PM Carr 106

Course Description

If the predominant mode of development in African cities is informal and unplanned giving rise to new modes of life, livelihood, and leisure beyond the organizing infrastructures of formal architecture and design in reality, the new African urbanism seems to give rise to two distinct conditions of life--the one crisis and the other ingenuity. This course is concerned to think through the paradox of rapid urban growth across the continent--from Lagos and Cairo to Johannesburg and Cape Town--and the fact that such rapid urban growth is taking place without the conventional facilities, infrastructures and technologies. Instructor: Makhulu
CULANTH 605
East Asian Cultural St Ching, Leo 01 W 01:25 PM-03:55 PM Trent 039

Course Description

East Asia as a historical and geographical category of knowledge emerging within the various processes of global movements (imperialism, colonialism, economic regionalism). Instructor consent required. Instructor: Ching
CULANTH 611
Global Mental Health Kaiser, Bronwyn 02 Th 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Trent 142

Course Description

Examination of global mental health from perspectives of culture, public health, epidemiology, human rights, policy, and intervention. Disciplines include cross-cultural psychiatry, medical anthropology, public mental health, and economics. Topics include ethics, stigma, cross-cultural classification of mental health, ethnopsychology, trauma, violence, disasters, and displacement. Populations include children, ethnic minorities, refugees, survivors of complex emergencies, and persons with chronic disease. Course highlights mixed-methods approaches to research and intervention evaluation. Designed for graduate students & advanced undergraduates. Prior research methods course recommended. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 641S
Citizen/subject:neoliberal Age Crichlow, Michaeline 01 W 06:15 PM-08:45 PM East Duke 204A

Course Description

Explores studies of citizenship, quests to belong to a place, and institutional mechanisms people deem sacred, and others, profane and dispensable. Focuses on the ways African, Caribbean and Pacific peoples have adapted identitarian constructions to develop narratives of home. Case studies using ethnographic, historical, sociological and visual methods are used to investigate how particular claims are pursued in clamoring for citizenship in various communities. Instructor: Crichlow
  • redbrick