The is a representative list of courses offered by the department and should not be used for schedule planning. For accurate and up-to-date course listings and information, Duke students should log into ACES.

Fall 2015

Course Title Instructor Section Time Room
CULANTH 80S
Studies-special Topics Shearer, Samuel 01 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM White 106

Course Description

Opportunities for first-year students to engage with a specific issue in cultural anthropology, with emphasis on student writing. Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 89S
First-year Seminar (top) Byerly, Ingrid Bianca 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 89S
First-year Seminar (top) Parish, Erin 02 TuTh 08:30 AM-09:45 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 89S
First-year Seminar (top) Dixon, Dwayne 03 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM White 106

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 89S
First-year Seminar (top) Jiménez, Alicia 10 W 01:25 PM-03:55 PM Social Sciences 107

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 101
Intro To Cultural Anthro Allison, Anne 01 MWF 10:20 AM-11:10 AM White 107

Course Description

Theoretical approaches to analyzing cultural beliefs and practices cross-culturally; application of specific approaches to case material from present and/or past cultures. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 105
Intro To African Studies Makhulu, Anne-Maria 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in contemporary African Studies: nationalism and pan-Africanism, imperialism and colonialism, genocide and famine, development and democratization, art and music, age and gender. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 106S
Doc Exper: A Video Appr Hawkins, Gary 01 W 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Bridges 104

Course Description

A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. Working closely with these groups, students explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Students complete an edited video as their final project. Not open to students who have taken this course as Film/Video/Digital 105S. Instructor: Hawkins
CULANTH 113FS
Enterprising Civic Engagement Bergene, Lisa 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Gilbert-Ad 03

Course Description

An exploration of ways that students can exercise enterprising leadership to develop innovative, resourceful solutions to important civic issues within and external to Duke University. Course includes four primary focuses: understanding models of change, exploring and practicing enterprising leadership behaviors, reflecting upon ethical values, and designing and implementing a civic engagement project on campus. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Bergene
CULANTH 131
World Music Meintjes, Louise 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Biddle 104

Course Description

Study of musical styles and practices in relation to issues of creativity, forms of power, and cultural survival; focus on the music and experiences of indigenous peoples, refugees, migrants, and immigrants. Instructor: Meintjes or staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Byerly, Ingrid Bianca 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Collier, Richard 02 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Admay, Catherine 04 MW 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Rubenstein 151

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 195
Comp Appr Global Issues Mathers, Catherine 01 MWF 01:40 PM-02:40 PM East Duke 204B

Course Description

Introduction to critical transnational studies through several disciplinary approaches. Examines capitalism and neo-liberal globalization and their relationships to culture, politics, economics, and other social forms and outcomes; considers transnationalism "from below"; addresses linear and Western-centric thinking about progress and modernity; focuses a historical lens on political discourses, institutions, and projects to understand them contextually; demonstrates how cultures and identities are dynamically constituted in interaction with historical, material, political, and situational factors; considers how different inequalities and contestations inflect most social formations. Instructor: Namakkal or Mathers
CULANTH 201
Intro To Linguistics Price, Gareth 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Old Chem 116

Course Description

Introduction to the scientific study of linguistics and languages. Topics include the origin and nature of language, methods of historical and comparative linguistics, theories and schools of linguistics, empirical and descriptive approaches to the study of language, including phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Instructor: Butters or Tetel
CULANTH 203
Marxism And Society Hardt, Michael 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Introduction to Marx's core concepts, such as alienation, commodity, and revolution. Includes examination of Marx's own major historical & political analyses, his economic texts, and his philosophical writings. Students also gain familiarity with the role of Marxist thought in different fields and disciplines, including feminist theory, anthropology, history, political science, and literary studies. Instructor: Hardt
CULANTH 212
Language And Society Baran, Dominika 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Old Chem 123

Course Description

Course examines language as a social practice, focusing on different aspects of its role in social life. Topics addressed include: language and social identity, such as ethnicity, social class, age, and gender; variation in language, including dialects, accents, and registers; multilingualism and language contact; new languages such as pidgins and creoles; language, culture, and intercultural communication; language and ideology; language in education and in the media. Through the discussion of these topics and homework including reading and small research projects, students are introduced to key concepts, theories, and methods in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Instructor: staff
CULANTH 214S
Shamanism & Spirit Posession Freeman, John 01 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Bell Dorm WEST 113

Course Description

Anthropological, psychological, and Religious Studies approaches to cross-cultural study of spirit possession and shamanism. Examination of in-depth case-studies and comparative works, from both literate civilizations and non-literate cultures. Engage with contemporary concerns with nature and boundaries of personhood and embodiment and their relation to leadership. Instructor: Freeman
CULANTH 215S
Indian Civilization Freeman, John 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Carr 242

Course Description

Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of pre-modern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials. Instructor: Freeman
CULANTH 241
Migrant China Litzinger, Ralph 01 W 04:40 PM-06:55 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Introduction to the study of contemporary China, including Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora. Key themes include family and kinship, sex and gender, regional diversity, ethnic minority relations, the politics of modernity, revolution, and reform, and the representation of Chinese identity through popular media, film, and travel. Instructor: Litzinger
CULANTH 258S
Our Culinary Cultures Alexander, Kelly 01 F 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Bridges 113

Course Description

Documentary approach to the world of food using fieldwork research. Topics of food and its preparation examined through deep stories of how food is raised, prepared, and presented in order to explore how the myriad ways in which what we eat reveal key biographical, economic, religious, and other truths about our cultures. Introduces students to the history of food writing and the concept of food in general as a nonverbal tool of communication. Photography, audio, and documentary writing employed. Instructor: Alexander
CULANTH 259
Music In South Asia Kramer, Jonathan 01 M 07:30 PM-10:00 PM Biddle 102

Course Description

South Asian musicians and their instruments, genres, performance traditions, and contexts. Study of the relationship of music to social, religious, historical, and philosophical trends informed by listening to the musical forms themselves in recorded and live performances. Instructor: Kramer
CULANTH 259S
Cold War Culture Holmgren, Beth 01 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM Languages 320

Course Description

Drawing on oral and written history, memoirs, film, fiction, and essays in anthropology and sociology, we'll resist the black/white readings imposed by the Iron Curtain and explore the dreams, fears, ethical concerns, cultural trends, and lifestyles of Cold War baby boomers in the USSR, Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Romania. Highlighted topics include: the privileges and discontents of postwar youth, the atomic age and its mutations, adventures in socialist consumer culture, gender politics and real life, making art about the socialist state of the absurd. All texts in English translation, films screened with English subtitles. Instructor: Holmgren
CULANTH 261
Race, Genomics, And Society Royal, Charmaine 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Divinity 0014

Course Description

Integrated analysis of historical and contemporary aspects of `race and genetics/genomics'. Focus on relevant applications in science, medicine, and society; develop skills required for scientific, sociopolitical, cultural, psychosocial, and ethical evaluation of issues. Topics include: introduction to population genetics/genetic variation; concepts and definitions of race; overview of bioethics; social and political history of race; genomics and health disparities; race, ancestry, and medical practice; genealogy, genetic ancestry, and identity; public perceptions of race and genetics/genomics. Instructor: Royal
CULANTH 262S
Documenting Black Experiences Tyson, Timothy 01 W 11:45 AM-02:15 PM Bridges 001

Course Description

Interpretations of the black diaspora in documentary film from slavery to the present. Interdisciplinary study of black religions, cultures, histories, aesthetics, politics, and their representations, both globally and in the U.S. Students will view and study a variety of films and approaches to film and study film's evolution through numerous lenses from early ethnographic film to recent works by indigenous filmmakers, and understand the politics of representation, from D.W. Griffith to Spike Lee; read relevant works in the genres represented; and hear from guest critics, scholars of African and African American history and culture, and filmmakers. Instructor: Tyson
CULANTH 263
Black Europe McIntosh, Laurie 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 135

Course Description

Exploration of the historical and contemporary presence and impact of the African diaspora throughout Europe. Course engages an anthropological examination of ethnographic texts, including examples of biography, film and visual culture. Instructor: McIntosh
CULANTH 278
Sex/gender - Nature/nurture Williams, Christina 01 MW 01:25 PM-02:40 PM LSRC A247

Course Description

Debates about sexuality, sex, and gender hinge on radically different ideas about relative effects of biological forces vs. social forces, or nature vs. nurture. Course changes terms of arguments about sexuality and gender and nature/nurture. Explores how nature/nurture emerged as scientific and popular debate. Evaluates new developments in science and cultural fields that are now reconsidering how biology and environments interact. Showcases debates about how sex and sexuality are formed through interplay of genetic information, hormones, material bodies, and social environments. Instructor: Wilson, Williams
CULANTH 284
Ritual And Performance Need, David 01 MW 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Gray 220

Course Description

Exposes students to theories of ritual and performance (Turner, Schechner, Grimes, Geertz, Paden) in religious and non-religious contexts; compares contexts as a way of understanding common structures and what differentiates the religious/non-religious. Guest lecturers (from religion, dance, theater, psychology, English, visual and media studies, cultural anthropology) expose students to a range of approaches to specific kinds of ritual and performance. Possibly involves both class and individual trips to local religious events and performances for field work exercises. No Instructor: Need
CULANTH 290
Current Issues (topics) Folch, Christine 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM East Duke 204A

Course Description

Selected topics in methodology, theory, or area. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Ho, Engseng 01 Th 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 118

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Namakkal, Jessica 05 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Perkins 079

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 301
Theoretical Foundations Stein, Rebecca 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Major schools and theories of cultural anthropology. Open to seniors and juniors. Sophomores by permission only. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 302
Fieldwork Methods Nelson, Diane 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice, including participation, observation, and interviews. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography. This requirement may also be satisfied by taking Cultural Anthropology 290A Duke in Ghana Anthropological Field Research. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 303S
Theory Today Chow, Rey 01 MW 01:25 PM-04:20 PM Friedl Bdg 102

Course Description

Introduction to major areas of research in Global Cultural Studies with focus on specific theoretical issues of contemporary concern in various subfields of global culture. Required for majors. One course. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 310S
Conflict Analysis In Africa Smith, Stephen 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

Utilizes four case studies to outline components of conflict analysis in Africa. Examines regional crisis nexus between Darfur, Chad and Central African Republic. Looks at issues of post-coloniality, autochthony, migration, citizenship, land tenure, and inequality. On a theoretical level, identifies potentially cross-cutting, deeper layers of contemporary crises in Africa with the objective of establishing a series of templates, a 'protocol', for comparative conflict analysis and conflict management in Africa. Instructor: Smith
CULANTH 315
Africa, Youth And Democracy Smith, Stephen 01 MW 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Gray 220

Course Description

Africa is an island of youth a Peter Pan s Neverland on an overall graying planet. This course explores the continent s youthfulness , in particular south of the Sahara where four out of ten inhabitants are under age 15 twice as many as in the United States. In a part of the world where the principle of seniority traditionally coupled aging with the hoarding of knowledge, authority, wealth and power, what does the abundance of young people mean for Africa s present and future, for its economy and popular culture, the transmission of norms and values, new digital lifestyles, war and peace? Special attention will be given to hypotheses linking youth and democratization. Instructor: Smith
CULANTH 316S
Breakdancers, Vocaloids & Game Dixon, Dwayne 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Social Sciences 107

Course Description

Youth subcultural styles, communities, and practices studied across East Asia. Through anthropology, films, and contemporary theory, class examines how young people create meaningful social worlds through varied practices, from the intense physicality of skateboarding to the virtual immersion of video gaming communities with their global sweep. Also study how young people are understood in historical periods and shaped by political forces, education, and the concepts of family. Consider how consumerism, body image, fantasies of agelessness, panics around unruly kids, and broader social shifts produce a volatile landscape for teenagers and young adults along the Pacific Rim. Instructor: Dixon
CULANTH 323
Fund. Of Global Mental Health Puffer, Eve 01 W 03:05 PM-05:20 PM Social Sciences 119

Course Description

Examines global mental health from perspectives of culture, public health, epidemiology, human rights, policy, and intervention. Readings focus on peer-reviewed research literature highlighting topics such as the prevalence of mental health disorders worldwide, the role of culture in mental health, and the interventions backed by strong evidence for prevention and treatment. Students will discuss and critique study methodologies and explore the needs for future research in this emerging field. Designed for students with prior research methods and psychology coursework. Instructor: Puffer
CULANTH 397S
Language In Immigrant America Baran, Dominika 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Allen 306

Course Description

Discussion of issues of language in the context of immigration in the United States, from the turn of the 20th century until the present, combining approaches from literature, memoirs, language policy, media studies, and linguistic anthropology. Some fieldwork in an immigrant community. Topics include: identity, assimilation, race, bilingual communities, bilingual education, foreign accents, language contact. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 422
Myth, Ritual, Symbol Nelson, Diane 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Cross cultural examination of roles of myths, rituals, and symbols in meaning-making, creation of identity, reproduction of cultural forms and challenges to the construction of "normal." Draws on ethnography, classical anthropological theory, film and participant-observation. Explores functionalist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, and feminist modes of analysis. Culture areas include Ndembu of Zambia, Maya of Guatemala, Turkish village life, Nazi Germany, and present-day United States. Instructor: Nelson
CULANTH 424-1
Medical Anthropology Solomon, Harris 01 WF 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Cross-cultural study of health and illness. Instructor: Solomon
CULANTH 432S
Gender, Sex & Citizenship McIntosh, Laurie 01 Tu 03:05 PM-05:35 PM White 201

Course Description

Explore current issues and debates relating to the relationship between gender, sexuality and global flows of people, labor, capital and ideas. Consider feminist analyses of the citizen-subject and foundational questions central to this area of study relationship between cultural representation, queer subjectivities, and sexual citizenship. Examine scholarship on gendered vulnerability and the welfare state; the politics of 'terror', security, and stereotyped masculinities; domestic labor and contemporary slavery; and the controversial debates about the connections between sex tourism, human trafficking and commercial sex work. Prereq: Previous gender studies course or consent of the instructor.Instructor: McIntosh
CULANTH 463S
Nightmare Japan Ching, Leo 01 Tu 01:25 PM-03:55 PM Languages 211

Course Description

Inquiry into social anxieties erupted through encounters with natural or man-made 'disasters.' Examine defining disasters of modern Japan - the encounter with the West, the imperialist war and subsequent defeat, nuclear bomb and the recent Fukushima meltdowns, earthquakes and tsunami, recession and its associated social malady. Reading through literature, films and popular culture as sites where fantasy and desire are materialized and projected in coping with these ineluctable catastrophes. Instructor: Ching
CULANTH 498S
Senior Distinction Seminar Silverblatt, Irene 01 Tu 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 118

Course Description

No credit for Cultural Anthropology 498S without satisfactory completion of Cultural Anthropology 499S. Consent of director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff
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