The is a representative list of courses offered by the department and should not be used for schedule planning. For accurate and up-to-date course listings and information, Duke students should log into ACES.

Fall 2013

Course Title Instructor Section Time Room
CULANTH 80S
Studies-special Topics Mathers, Catherine 01 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM Friedl Bdg 126

Course Description

Opportunities for first-year students to engage with a specific issue in cultural anthropology, with emphasis on student writing. Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 89S
First-year Seminar (top) Byerly, Ingrid Bianca 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 89S
First-year Seminar (top) Collier, Richard 02 TuTh 03:05 PM-04:20 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 89S
First-year Seminar (top) Kwon, Nayoung Aimee 04 Th 12:00 PM-02:30 PM Trent 039

Course Description

Topics vary each semester offered. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 101
Intro To Cultural Anthro Starn, Orin 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM White 107

Course Description

Theoretical approaches to analyzing cultural beliefs and practices cross-culturally; application of specific approaches to case material from present and/or past cultures. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 105
Intro To African Studies Smith, Stephen 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Gray 220

Course Description

A range of disciplinary perspectives on key topics in contemporary African Studies: nationalism and pan-Africanism, imperialism and colonialism, genocide and famine, development and democratization, art and music, age and gender. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 106S
Doc Exper: A Video Appr Hawkins, Gary 01 W 10:05 AM-12:35 PM Bridges 104

Course Description

A documentary approach to the study of local communities through video production projects assigned by the course instructor. Working closely with these groups, students explore issues or topics of concern to the community. Students complete an edited video as their final project. Not open to students who have taken this course as Film/Video/Digital 105S. Instructor: Hawkins
CULANTH 130
Anthropology And Film O'Barr, William 01 MW 03:05 PM-05:35 PM White 107

Course Description

The study of feature films and documentaries on issues of colonialism, imperialism, war and peace, and cultural interaction. An introduction to critical film theory and film production in non-Western countries. Instructor: Allison or Litzinger
CULANTH 131
World Music Byerly, Ingrid Bianca 01 W 06:15 PM-08:45 PM Biddle 104

Course Description

Study of musical styles and practices in relation to issues of creativity, forms of power, and cultural survival; focus on the music and experiences of indigenous peoples, refugees, migrants, and immigrants. Instructor: Meintjes or staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Byerly, Ingrid Bianca 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Quinn, Naomi 02 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Crowell 108

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Admay, Catherine 03 MW 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Rubenstein 149

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 190FS
Special Topics In Focus Brown, Margaret 04 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Friedl Bdg 126

Course Description

Selected topics vary each semester. Open only to students in the Focus Program. Instructor consent required. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 195
Comp Appr Global Issues Campoamor, Leigh 01 MWF 01:40 PM-02:40 PM Biddle 101

Course Description

Introduction to critical transnational studies through several disciplinary approaches. Examines capitalism and neo-liberal globalization and their relationships to culture, politics, economics, and other social forms and outcomes; considers transnationalism "from below"; addresses linear and Western-centric thinking about progress and modernity; focuses a historical lens on political discourses, institutions, and projects to understand them contextually; demonstrates how cultures and identities are dynamically constituted in interaction with historical, material, political, and situational factors; considers how different inequalities and contestations inflect most social formations. Instructor: Campoamor or Namakkal
CULANTH 201
Intro To Linguistics Price, Gareth 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Biddle 104

Course Description

Introduction to the scientific study of linguistics and languages. Topics include the origin and nature of language, methods of historical and comparative linguistics, theories and schools of linguistics, empirical and descriptive approaches to the study of language, including phonology, morphology, semantics, and syntax. Instructor: Butters or Tetel
CULANTH 206
Anthropology Of Law Sobel-Read, Kevin 01 MW 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Crowell 108

Course Description

Comparative approach to jurisprudence and legal practice, dispute resolution, law-making institutions and processes, and the relation of law to politics, culture, and values. Instructor: O'Barr
CULANTH 208
Anthropology Of Race Baker, Lee 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Perkins 2-071

Course Description

Human variation and the historical development of concepts of race; science and scientific racism; folk-concepts of race; and the political and economic causes of racism; ethics of racism. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 209
Sport As Performance Conceison, Claire 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Page 106

Course Description

Sport as ritual, spectacle, and performance explored through theatre, performance studies, sociology, anthropology, and history. Topics range from professional and collegiate team sports to individual athletic performances, in both domestic and global contexts. The performance aspects and ethics of race, gender, sexuality, and nation in live sport and in the media are examined. Coursework consists of written assignments, short papers, mid-term and final exam. Guest speakers from the worlds of athletics and theatre visit the class during the semester. Instructor: Conceison
CULANTH 212
Language And Society Baran, Dominika 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Soc/Psych 129

Course Description

Course examines language as a social practice, focusing on different aspects of its role in social life. Topics addressed include: language and social identity, such as ethnicity, social class, age, and gender; variation in language, including dialects, accents, and registers; multilingualism and language contact; new languages such as pidgins and creoles; language, culture, and intercultural communication; language and ideology; language in education and in the media. Through the discussion of these topics and homework including reading and small research projects, students are introduced to key concepts, theories, and methods in sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology. Instructor: staff
CULANTH 215S
Indian Civilization Freeman, John 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Carr 241

Course Description

Surveys the rise of civilization and kingdoms on the Indian subcontinent from the first urban centers of the Indus Valley through the establishment of the Mughal Empire in the 16th century. Uses literary, archeological, linguistic, ethnological, and inscriptional evidence on the diversity of Indic peoples and their complex social, religious, and caste integration into the major states and empires of premodern India; considers wider civilizational networks and extensions of the Indian cultural sphere into other parts of Asia; integrates a historical and anthropological perspective on various primary materials. Instructor: Freeman
CULANTH 216S
Global Migration & Ethics McIntosh, Laurie 01 Th 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 118

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 216 except in seminar format. Instructor: McIntosh
CULANTH 226
Espionage, Cryptology, Psyops Gessler, Nicholas 01 W 10:05 AM-12:55 PM Perkins 2-072

Course Description

Explores cultural context of spies, codes and psychological operations from perspectives of anthropology, complexity and multiple agency, towards understanding how tradecrafts of intelligence and disinformation shaped, and continue to shape us and our information technologies. Work with historic and contemporary, previously classified and open sources, case studies and multimedia, including hands-on practice with propaganda leaflets, cryptographic machines and cryptanalysis, to explain the roles of networks of trust, secrecy and deception in cultural coevolution. No
CULANTH 241
Culture/politics-china Litzinger, Ralph 01 MW 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Carr 114

Course Description

Introduction to the study of contemporary China, including Taiwan and the Chinese Diaspora. Key themes include family and kinship, sex and gender, regional diversity, ethnic minority relations, the politics of modernity, revolution, and reform, and the representation of Chinese identity through popular media, film, and travel. Instructor: Litzinger
CULANTH 246S
Civil/human Rights Activism Lau, Barbara A 01 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Bridges 113

Course Description

Documentary fieldwork course exploring the legacy of civil and human rights activism in Durham through the life and work of noted historian, lawyer, poet, activist and priest Pauli Murray. Students will utilize scholarship, primary source archival materials and contemporary documentary projects to set a context for their fieldwork in Durham. Working with the instructor and local social change leadership engaged in work related to the
CULANTH 254
The Americas Borderlands Nelson, Diane 01 WF 10:05 AM-11:20 AM White 106

Course Description

Am
CULANTH 258S
Our Culinary Cultures Alexander, Kelly L 01 F 10:05 AM-12:05 PM Bridges 113

Course Description

Documentary approach to the world of food using fieldwork research. Topics of food and its preparation examined through deep stories of how food is raised, prepared, and presented in order to explore how the myriad ways in which what we eat reveal key biographical, economic, religious, and other truths about our cultures. Introduces students to the history of food writing and the concept of food in general as a nonverbal tool of communication. Photography, audio, and documentary writing employed. Instructor: Alexander
CULANTH 265
Culture & Pol Contemp Europe McIntosh, Laurie 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Critically examine current scholarship on the anthropology of Europe, and social and political theories concerning perplexities of identities, citizenship, nationalism, and national identity formation, with focus on related ethical questions and dilemmas. Instructor: McIntosh
CULANTH 271
Gender And Culture Silverblatt, Irene 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Explanation of differing beliefs about gender cross-culturally, by comparison with dominant themes about gender in our own cultural history and contemporary ideological struggles. Instructor: Allison or Silverblatt
CULANTH 290
Current Issues (topics) Wilson, Ara 01 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Gray 220

Course Description

Selected topics in methodology, theory, or area. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290
Current Issues (topics) Aidoo, Lamonte 02 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Selected topics in methodology, theory, or area. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290
Current Issues (topics) Aidoo, Lamonte 03 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Allen 304I

Course Description

Selected topics in methodology, theory, or area. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290
Current Issues (topics) Bassiri, Nima 04 WF 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Branson 202

Course Description

Selected topics in methodology, theory, or area. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Human Rights And The Body O'Barr, William 01 M 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Rego, Marcia 03 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CA 290S
Topics: Women Of Color In The Americas Brown, Layla 04 4:40p - 5:55p Old Chem 116

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Brown, Layla 04 TuTh 04:40 PM-05:55 PM Old Chem 116

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Kirk, Robin 05 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Carr 136

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 290S
Current Issues (topics) Greenlee, Cynthia 06 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

Same as Cultural Anthropology 290 except instruction is provided in seminar format. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 301
Theoretical Foundations Makhulu, Anne-Maria 01 MW 08:30 AM-09:45 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Theoretical Foundations is designed to introduce you to modern social and anthropological theory. The semester traces the emergence of key questions, concepts, and problems addressed by each. These might include: the nature of society, the individual’s relationship to society, the division of labor (who does what, what roles different people play in the economy, etc.), the relationship between the social system as a whole and the actions of individuals within it (what some have coined “structure” versus “agency”), and whether human beings are principally the outcome of their society or whether they intervene to shape their own lives and those of others or even the system as a whole. We will mostly follow the development of the 20th century Anglo-French and American schools of structural(ist) and cultural anthropology, respectively. Anticipating the subsequent path of the discipline, we end with a brief glance at the radical turn the discipline took in the aftermath of the 1960s. Our focus: the ways in which Enlightenment reason set the stage for the emergence of key historical transformations and the ways by which anthropology responded critically and theoretically shaping new approaches to the study of the industrial revolution, capitalism, colonial overrule, and the rise of the modern state.
CULANTH 302
Fieldwork Methods Matza, Tomas 01 WF 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Anthropology as a discipline (a field of study) and the site where anthropologists work: the field. Combines theories of anthropological fieldwork methods with practice, including participation, observation, and interviews. Students undertake original research in a local fieldsite of their choice and produce their own mini-ethnography. This requirement may also be satisfied by taking Cultural Anthropology 290A Duke in Ghana Anthropological Field Research. Instructor: Staff
CULANTH 307
Development And Africa Haynie, Kerry L 01 Th 10:05 AM-12:35 PM SEE INSTRU

Course Description

Addresses the vexed issue of economic development in Africa - its many failures, its occasional successes - from the early colonial period to the present. Focuses especially on the transition from the 1960s "modernizing
CULANTH 310S
Conflict Analysis In Africa Smith, Stephen 01 MW 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

Utilizes four case studies to outline components of conflict analysis in Africa. Examines regional crisis nexus between Darfur, Chad and Central African Republic. Looks at issues of post-coloniality, autochthony, migration, citizenship, land tenure, and inequality. On a theoretical level, identifies potentially cross-cutting, deeper layers of contemporary crises in Africa with the objective of establishing a series of templates, a 'protocol', for comparative conflict analysis and conflict management in Africa. Instructor: Smith
CULANTH 323S
Fund. Of Global Mental Health Puffer, Eve 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Soc/Psych 128

Course Description

Examines global mental health from perspectives of culture, public health, epidemiology, human rights, policy, and intervention. Readings focus on peer-reviewed research literature highlighting topics such as the prevalence of mental health disorders worldwide, the role of culture in mental health, and the interventions backed by strong evidence for prevention and treatment. Students will discuss and critique study methodologies and explore the needs for future research in this emerging field. Designed for students with prior research methods and psychology coursework. Instructor: Puffer
CULANTH 334
Chinese Prostitution Rojas, Carlos 01 TuTh 01:25 PM-02:40 PM
M 07:30 PM-09:45 PM
Crowell 108

Course Description

Dialectic of prostitution as lived experience, and as socio-cultural metaphor. Focus on literary and cinematic texts, together with relevant theoretical works. The figure of the prostitute will be used to interrogate assumptions about gender identity, commodity value, and national discourse. Transnational traffic in women will provide context for examination of discourses of national identity in China and beyond, together with the fissures at the heart of those same discourses. Instructor: Rojas
CULANTH 342
Migration & Human Trafficking Crichlow, Michaeline 01 M 06:15 PM-08:15 PM Friedl Bdg 107

Course Description

Examination of the meaning of migration in the global world through cross-disciplinary texts and visual media. Situates the phenomenon of human trafficking within the context of these general movements focusing on the risks involved when people endanger their lives to find a better and more strategic position in the world. Explores how these experiences should be interpreted, and how processes and the politics of race, space and place are a condition and/or outcome of these movements. Investigates and considers ways to resolve some of the problems associated with such movements. Instructor: Crichlow
CULANTH 344
Slavery, Genocide & Terror Holsey, Bayo 01 TuTh 11:45 AM-01:00 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

Examination of commemorative practices surrounding difficult pasts. Analyzes slavery, the Holocaust, Hiroshima, and 9/11; considers the role of collective memories of trauma and injustice in the formation of racial, religious, and national identities. Readings address historic sites, monuments and other forms of commemorative art, museums, fiction, and film. Examines social, political, ethical, and economic considerations behind various forms of commemoration. Explores several debates over appropriate forms of commemorations and the consideration of politics of memory in the creation of ethical subjects. Instructor: Holsey
CULANTH 367D
Mayas, Aztecs And Incas Mignolo, Walter 001 M 01:25 PM-02:40 PM West Duke 202

Course Description

The basic philosophical architecture of the three great civilizations of America; Maya, Aztec and Inca civilizations. Links the current indigenous revival in the Andes (Bolivia and Ecuador) and in the South of Mexico and Guatemala with the survival of their historical legacies. Instructor: Mignolo
CULANTH 367D
Mayas, Aztecs And Incas Mignolo, Walter 01D W 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Crowell 107

Course Description

The basic philosophical architecture of the three great civilizations of America; Maya, Aztec and Inca civilizations. Links the current indigenous revival in the Andes (Bolivia and Ecuador) and in the South of Mexico and Guatemala with the survival of their historical legacies. Instructor: Mignolo
CULANTH 367D
Mayas, Aztecs And Incas Mignolo, Walter 02D W 01:25 PM-02:40 PM West Duke 108A

Course Description

The basic philosophical architecture of the three great civilizations of America; Maya, Aztec and Inca civilizations. Links the current indigenous revival in the Andes (Bolivia and Ecuador) and in the South of Mexico and Guatemala with the survival of their historical legacies. Instructor: Mignolo
CULANTH 367D
Mayas, Aztecs And Incas Mignolo, Walter 03D W 01:25 PM-02:40 PM Allen 103

Course Description

The basic philosophical architecture of the three great civilizations of America; Maya, Aztec and Inca civilizations. Links the current indigenous revival in the Andes (Bolivia and Ecuador) and in the South of Mexico and Guatemala with the survival of their historical legacies. Instructor: Mignolo
CULANTH 385S
Ethnography Of African Diaspoa Matory, J. 01 Th 04:40 PM-07:10 PM Friedl Bdg 240

Course Description

Course reveals the diversity of black life in the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East through film and classical and contemporary ethnographies by the likes of W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, Fernando Ortiz,and others. Examines diverse analytical tropes that illuminate how cultures and communities reproduce themselves amid exploitation and stigma. Instructor: Matory
CULANTH 403S
Politics Of Memory Silverblatt, Irene 01 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Explores political contexts, and often competing visions, surrounding construction and reproduction of public memory. Asks how sites of memory, presenting an image of the past, express understandings, desires, and conflicts of the present. Particular focus on how times of crisis and trauma are commemorated, challenged, or hidden. Open only to juniors and seniors. Instructor: Silverblatt
CULANTH 416S
Cap Sem:imperialism & Islamism Ho, Engseng 01 W 04:40 PM-07:10 PM Bivins 109

Course Description

Inquiry into Islam's transnational past and relations of European empires to that past. Development of perspectives on the current conflict between the US and its Islamist opponents to enable critical engagement with debates on the nature of global Islamist politics and on the US as an imperial power. Close reading of case studies and original source material. Instructor: Ho
CULANTH 424T
Medical Anthropology Solomon, Harris 01 TuTh 10:05 AM-11:20 AM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

Cross-cultural study of health and illness. Instructor: Solomon
CULANTH 431S
Global Tibet Litzinger, Ralph 01 W 03:05 PM-05:35 PM Perkins 2-070

Course Description

Exploration of Tibet in regional, national, and global perspective, from the nineteenth century to the present; critical appraisal of the Tibet Question, the global image of Tibet as a mystical and utopian Shangri-la; and the geopolitical and socioeconomic dimensions of social movements to know, develop, free, save, and defend Tibet. Course materials draw from anthropology, history, international politics, film and popular culture, novels, web sites and blogs. Previous knowledge of Tibet and China, and theories colonialism, imperialism, nationalism, and post-colonialism. Permission of instructor required. Instructor: Litzinger
CULANTH 465S
Global Cities Makhulu, Anne-Maria 01 M 06:15 PM-08:45 PM Friedl Bdg 216

Course Description

Examination of new ways of living and surviving in cities across the world - new urbanization as distinct from the "new urbanism" - in context of the decline of the industrial economy, the offshoring of work, the creation of network cities and so-called "global cities." Explores impact of increased urbanization, linked to "post-wage" work, informalization, and inequality. Addresses dilemmas of alternative forms of life through "cases," including cities in the global North and South, varied "urban" schools, their theories and methodologies. Instructor: Makhulu
CULANTH 498S
Senior Distinction Seminar Settle, Heather 01 W 06:15 PM-08:45 PM Friedl Bdg 204

Course Description

No credit for Cultural Anthropology 498S without satisfactory completion of Cultural Anthropology 499S. Consent of director of undergraduate studies required. Instructor: Staff
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